Me he pasado la semana estudiando la parábola Jesús del juez injusto. Si no está familiarizado con la historia y luego yo puedo llenar. Una viuda sin pararse, ninguna influencia en su comunidad, couldn’t get justice to save her life. Ella fue al juez, but he didn’t want to be bothered by her. She kept at the judge until she wore him down and he gave in to her request. Ahora, there’s a reason Jesus told the story and we’ll get to that in a minute, but it got me to thinking about all of you who are parents.

If you are a parent with little ones still at home, even if all of your kids are grown, you will still be able to relate. Can you remember a time when one of your kids wanted something? I don’t mean they gave it a passing thought, I mean they really wanted it. At their first ask you probably said, “Not right now” or “Let me think about it” or “No, I don’t think that’s a good idea.” Truth is we’ve probably all responded to our kids in all of those ways. Pero, kids being kids, they wouldn’t take “No” for an answer. Kids are really smart. They wait until the time is right and come at us again. tu dices, “I promise you that if you keep asking me you’ll never get it.” They wait some more. You begin to notice that they are extra nice to you, they’re even nice to their siblings. Then they come at you with a list, written on a piece of paper. "Mamá, I’ve been thinking…” Huh oh! You see it coming don’t you? They read their list: They promise they’ll take the trash out for a month, clean their room every day, do laundry, and feed you breakfast in bed for the rest of your life…si, if only you’ll get them what they want. You may resist for awhile, but they are persistent, implacable, and untiring in their mission to get what they want. Eventually you caved. Venga, admit it. You know you did! I did too. ¿Cómo se hace eso? Why does that happen? And we swore we would never let it happen again. How did it happen? La respuesta es muy simple: They just flat wore us down until they wore us out!

If this has ever happened to you then you are in a good place to understand how the woman in Jesus’ parable got what she wanted. There’s a much greater lesson to Jesus’ parable that I hope we can learn this morning so let’s turn to Luke 18:1-8 y leamos juntos.

1 Then Jesus told his disciples a parable to show them that they should always pray and not give up. 2 El dijo: «En una cierta ciudad había un juez que ni temía a Dios ni le importaban los hombres. 3 Y había en ese pueblo que mantuvo llegando a él con la súplica de una viuda, ‘Grant me justice against my adversary.4 «Durante algún tiempo se negó. Pero finalmente dijo a sí mismo, ‘Even though I don’t fear God or care about men, 5 sin embargo porque esta viuda me sigue molestando, Voy a ver que ella obtiene justicia, so that she won’t eventually wear me out with her coming!'» 6 And the Lord said, «Listen to what the unjust judge says. 7 And will not God bring about justice for his chosen ones, who cry out to him day and night? Will he keep putting them off? 8 Te digo, he will see that they get justice, and quickly. Sin embargo, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth (Lucas 18:1-8 NIVO)

It’s always important to understand the context of what Jesus is saying before we try to understand the text. To understand the context you have to go back to Luke 17. En Lucas 17, Jesus was teaching the disciples about what would take place at His return. En el versículo 26, Jesús dijo:, “Just as it was in the days of Noah, so also it will be in the days of the Son of Man.” Entonces, en el versículo 28, Jesús dijo:, “It was the same in days of Lot…” What will it be like when Jesus’ returns? It will be like it was in the days of Noah and Lot. Jesus wants to prepare His followers for that day. When we turn to Luke 18, and the beginning of our parable, leemos,

1 Then Jesus told his disciples a parable to show them that they should always pray and not give up. (Lucas 18:1 NIVO)

This is such an important word from Jesus. Jesus told a parable to show His followers that they should always pray and not give up. It’s that last phrase that has captured my heart this week. Orar. No te rindas. Other translations say, “Pray and not lose heart,” “pray and not become discouraged,” or “pray and not faint.” The Greek word translated “not give up” is «ekkakeo» y significa, “to be utterly spiritless, para ser cansado a cabo, exhausted.” I know that every single person here this morning can relate to being utterly spiritless, wearied out, and exhausted by the troubles and trials of life. This is true of all of us, pero recuerde que, this section of Scripture is linked to what Jesus had to say in Luke 17 about His return one day.

I want you to know that living with the return of Jesus in mind is a game changer. Paul wrote to the people of Thessalonica to encourage them to live holy lives, to serve God with all of their hearts, and to remind them that those who die “in Christ” are safe and better than ever with our King. Then he wrote,

15 According to the Lord’s own word, we tell you that we who are still alive, who are left till the coming of the Lord, will certainly not precede those who have fallen asleep. 16 Porque el Señor mismo descenderá del cielo, con voz de mando, con voz de arcángel, y con trompeta de Dios, y los muertos en Cristo resucitarán primero. 17 Después de esto, Somos nosotros los que todavía estamos vivos y que permanezcamos, seremos arrebatados juntamente con ellos en las nubes para recibir al Señor en el aire. Y así estaremos siempre con el Señor. 18 Por eso, anímense unos a otros con estas palabras. (1 Tesalonicenses 4:15-18 NIVO)

Qué tal!? Encourage each other with these words. If we die, we die “in Christ.” If we continue to live, we live “in Christ” and “for Christ” knowing that one day He will come for all of His own. Jesus said that we should always pray and not lose heart, not become discouraged, and not give up. We are to pray with our eyes set on heaven, pray with our hearts anchored in the sovereignty of our God, and pray with the assurance that our God, our Judge, is not like the unjust judge in Jesus’ parable.

There are only two characters in Jesus’ parable. There is the widow and the judge. Vea el versículo 2 dice.

2 El dijo: «En una cierta ciudad había un juez que ni temía a Dios ni le importaban los hombres. (Lucas 18:2 NIVO)

We don’t know the name of the town, but we do know the character of the judge. Jesus said he “neither feared God nor cared about men.” I have no idea how much judicial experience this judge had, I’ve never read any of his decisions, but I can tell you he was not a good judge. He lacked wisdom. You may wonder how I got that out of this one verse? I’ll show you. En Proverbios 9:10 leemos,

10 «El temor de Jehová es el principio de la sabiduría, y el conocimiento del Santísimo es la inteligencia. (Proverbios 9:10 NIVO)

This judge didn’t fear God and the writer of Proverbs tells us that the fear of God is the beginning of wisdom, y el conocimiento del Santísimo es la inteligencia. Cuando se le preguntó a Jesús, en Lucas 10, which of the commandments was the greatest, leemos,

27 Contestó: «Amarás al Señor tu Dios con todo tu corazón y con toda tu alma y con todas tus fuerzas y con toda tu mente'; y, Amarás a tu prójimo como a ti mismo.» (Lucas 10:27 NIVO)

This judge loved neither God nor his neighbor. He was not a good judge. We can know that before we ever come to verse 3 and the evidence Jesus gives us, that in fact, he wasn’t a good judge.

En el versículo 3, Jesus tells us a widow in the judge’s town kept coming to him. She wanted justice and if you want justice then you are supposed to be able to go to the judge. She did what she was supposed to do, pero él se negó. She was a nobody. She was in a tough, situación difícil. Her husband had died and she had no man in her life: no father, hermano, or uncle to defend her. How do we know that? Bien, the court system was for men, not for women. No woman would come to the court unless they had no man in their life. The court system was not like it is today. Ella, like so many widows, was powerless and helpless, but the judge wouldn’t help her. How unlike God was the judge who didn’t want to be bothered by the widow? Bien, vuelta conmigo al Salmo 68:4-5 and I will show you.

4 Sing to God, sing praise to his name, extol him who rides on the cloudshis name is the LORDand rejoice before him. 5 Un padre para los huérfanos, un defensor de las viudas, es Dios en su Santa morada. (Salmos 68:4-5 NIVO)

Unlike the unjust judge, God is a defender of widows. Have you ever taken the time to understand how favored widows are by God? We can go all the way back to Exodus 22 and hear God tell His people, “Do not take advantage of a widow or an orphan” (Éxodo 22:22 NIVO).  En Deuteronomio 10, we see once again how God rises up to defend the weak and powerless. Leer conmigo comenzando en el versículo 17.

17 Porque Jehová vuestro Dios es Dios de dioses y Señor de señores, el gran Dios, poderoso y temible, que no hace acepción de personas ni acepta sobornos. 18 Él defiende la causa del huérfano y de la viuda, y le encanta el extranjero, dándole pan y vestido. (Deuteronomio 10:17-18 NIVO)

A little later in Deuteronomy we learn that a portion of the tithes collected in the third year was to help the widows, fatherless, and aliens in the community (Deut. 14:28-29). Entonces, en Deuteronomio 24:19-22, we learn that when God’s people were harvesting their fields, collecting olives and grapes, they weren’t to go over their crops a second timeGod said leave them for the widows, fatherless, and aliens. How unlike God was the judge who didn’t want to be bothered by the widow?!

The woman was so desperate she wouldn’t take “No” for an answer. She kept going back to the judge. She met him as he arrived in the morning to take his gavel and put on his robe. She was waiting for him at the end of the day when he just wanted to get home. She would show up in his courtroom with a sign that read, "No hay justicia! No hay paz!” She would not let the man rest until she got what she deserved. Finalmente, leemos,

4 «Durante algún tiempo se negó. Pero finalmente dijo a sí mismo, ‘Even though I don’t fear God or care about men, 5 sin embargo porque esta viuda me sigue molestando, Voy a ver que ella obtiene justicia, so that she won’t eventually wear me out with her coming!'» (Lucas 18:4-5 NIVO)

Even though he didn’t fear God or care about people, the judge gave in to the woman’s request because she would not stop bothering him. It wasn’t love that moved the judge, it wasn’t justice that moved the judge, it wasn’t compassion or wisdom that moved the judge. The judge gave in for selfish reasonshe was tired of being hassled by the woman. Entonces, en el versículo 6, Jesús dijo:,

6 And the Lord said, «Listen to what the unjust judge says.” (Lucas 18:6 NIVO)

“Listen, prestar atención, don’t miss what the unjust judge just said!” The Greek word used by Jesus is an imperative. “Don’t miss it!” Why did Jesus highlight what the unjust judge said for His disciples? That’s a great question and the answer is, because He wanted to draw a sharp, sharp contrast between the unjust judge who finally gave in and the Judge of all humanity who is so unlike the unjust judge.  Let’s read together Jesus’ final words found in Luke 18:7-8.

7 And will not God bring about justice for his chosen ones, who cry out to him day and night? Will he keep putting them off? 8 Te digo, he will see that they get justice, and quickly. Sin embargo, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth (Lucas 18:7-8 NIVO)

Ahora, I need to make something really clear. The point of the parable is not that we are to nag God, keep badgering Him over and over again, or to pray long rambling repetitious prayers until we finally wear Him down like the widow wore down the judge. The point of the parable is the stark contrast between the unjust judge and our God. When you understand the character of God, His love and desire for you, then you will know that He is our Refuge and Strength, He is our Hope and Deliverer, He is our Strength and Ever-Present-Help in our time of need.

When Jesus asked, “And will not God bring about justice for his chosen ones, who cry out to him day and night?" it is intended to be answered with an emphatic, “You better believe He will!” The widow was nobody to the unjust judge and yet Jesus points out that all who have believed in Him are God’s “chosen ones.” Jesus was talking to His disciples one day when He said,

15 Ya no llamo siervos, porque un siervo no sabe de negocios de su amo. En lugar, Os he llamado amigos, por todo lo que aprendí de mi padre he conocido a usted. 16 No me elegisteis, pero te eligió y nombró a que vayáis y deis fruto– fruta que va a durar. Entonces el padre le dará todo lo que pidáis en mi nombre. (Juan 15:15-16 NIVO)

“I chose you…” Just think about that for a minute. The Bible teaches that we have sinned against God, separated ourselves from God because of our sin, and yet God sent Jesus to rescue us, to redeem us, to give His life in our place so we might be reconciled to God. When you heard the Gospel something happened. You recognized your need for God’s forgiveness. You recognized your need for God’s salvation. You recognized that Jesus had come for you, died for you, and was calling you. You recognized all of that, but it was God who opened your eyes, softened your heart, and brought all of us who were dead in our sins to life. Pablo escribió a la gente en Tesalónica,

13 But we ought always to thank God for you, brothers loved by the Lord, because from the beginning God chose you to be saved through the sanctifying work of the Spirit and through belief in the truth. 14 He called you to this through our gospel, that you might share in the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. (2 Tesalonicenses 2:13-14 NIVO)

Those who belong to God, elegido por Dios, are to “cry out to God both day and night.” Did you see that in verse 7. Does that phrase characterize your prayer life? Do you cry out to God in the morning, durante todo el día, and at night while you are laying in bed? I wish that was the description of my life, Pero no es. I would say that most of us probably cry out to God when we are in trouble, when we are facing things in life that we just can’t handle.

A lady came to G. Campbell Morgan, the pastor of Westminster Chapel in London in the early 1900s. She told Pastor Morgan, “I only take the big things to God. I don’t take the little things to God.” Pastor Morgan looked at her and said, “Mam, anything you take to God is little.” We should see all of life, every moment of every day, every decision we must make as an opportunity to take it to God. Not only should we take everything to God, pero lata take everything to God. Isn’t that mind boggling? Te voy a mostrar lo que estoy diciendo. Venga conmigo a Jeremías 33:2-3.

2 «Esto es lo que dice el Señor, el que hizo la tierra, el SEÑOR que formó y estableció– el Señor es su nombre: 3 "Clama a mí y yo te responderé, y te dicen cosas grandes e inescrutables que no conoces.’ (Jeremías 33:2-3 NIVO)

Did you hear the invitation? Dios dice, “Call to me and I will answer you…” God will answer, He will always answer. There are times when we feel like our prayers bounce off the ceiling. There are times when God seems so distant. There are times when it feels like God is far removed and uncaring about our situation, but during those times we must allow the truths of God’s Word to correct our feelings. God always answers our prayers, but sometimes they are not the answers we are looking for or the answer we desire. Tim Keller, the former pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York, escribió, “God will answer all of our prayers exactly like we would answer our prayers if we knew all he knew.” When we don’t get the answer we want do we turn away or do we continue to seek God with all of our hearts? We must pray or we will most certainly lose heart.

En el Nuevo Testamento, en el libro de Hebreos, we hear the invitation again. The invitation to draw near to God so that we might receive the help, the grace we need, in our time of need. Leer conmigo desde Hebreos 4:14-16.

14 Por lo tanto, ya que tenemos un gran sumo sacerdote que traspasó los cielos, Jesús el hijo de Dios, llevemos a cabo firmemente a la fe que profesamos. 15 Porque no tenemos un sumo sacerdote que no pueda compadecerse de nuestras debilidades, pero tenemos uno que ha sido tentado en todo, tal y como somos– pero sin pecado. 16 Entonces Acerquémonos al trono de gracia con confianza, para que podamos recibir misericordia y hallar gracia para ayudarnos en nuestro tiempo de necesidad. (Hebreos 4:14-16 NIVO)

This should overwhelm us my friends. The God of glory who created us, offered His Son so we could be reconciled to Himself, invites us to come to His throne with confidence. I heard a story one time about President Kennedy. He was in a meeting when his young son came walking through the doors of the Oval Office. The President held out his arms and his little boy walked over to his dad, sat in his lap, and the meeting went on as planned. Who does that? Who could get away with that? The son of the President that’s who. And you and I are sons and daughters of the King of Glory! Won’t you come with confidence before our great God this very morning?

One last thing before we leave here this morning. Let’s read the last verse of our study for this morning found in Luke 18:8.

8 Te digo, he will see that they get justice, and quickly. Sin embargo, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth (Lucas 18:8 NIVO)

I want us to focus on the last sentence. "Sin embargo, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth?” Once again Jesus is talking about His return, but He asks a question. “Will he find faith on the earth?” Most Bible teachers believe what Jesus is really asking is, “Will He find us faithful on the earth?” Will it be like the days of Noah and the days of Lot when so few were faithful to God? Will He find you and me faithful? Pray my friend. No te rindas, don’t lose heart. Pray and cling to the Father.

Mike Hays

Marzo 17, 2019

La parábola del juez injusto
Lucas 18:1-8
Etiquetado: